Workshops


Pre- and Post-Conference Workshops

Workshop 1: An Upstream Approach to Frailty

Wednesday, March 7, 2018 (pre-conference)
10:00 am to 3:00 pm
$100 for conference attendees ($75 for students), or $125 as a stand-alone workshop (lunch included)

Frailty is a significant and growing issue in Canada. By 2025, two million Canadians will be living with frailty and 3.75 million Canadians will be caregivers. Often, those aged 65 years and older can become prematurely frail. Once frail, those aged 65+ are less resilient to recover from significant life events and/or respond to acute care treatments; and often, progress towards increased frailty.

In the morning, participants will learn about how artificial intelligence methods (e.g, machine learning) can be used to identify frailty within electronic medical records. In the afternoon, we will showcase work undertaken by Fraser Health Authority through the CARES (Community Actions and Resources Empowering Seniors) initiative. CARES is a health authority, primary care physician and community collaborative that seeks to shift healthcare delivery from downstream reactive care to upstream proactive and holistic care for those identified as frail. We will examine current tools that are being used to assess older adults’ frailty, how these assessments can fit into clinic flow, and how assessment findings can be used to connect frail older adults to appropriate community resources using a team-based care approach.

Speakers
Tyler Williamson, University of Calgary
Annette Garm, Fraser Health
Grace Park, Fraser Health

This is an interactive workshop in which participants will learn about frailty through presentations, case studies and dialogue.

Registration is open. If you have already registered for the conference, you may amend your registration to add the workshop.

Questions? Please contact Kasra Hassani at kasra.hassani@ubc.ca


Workshop 2: The Evolving Ethics of Research with First Nations in Canada

Friday, March 9, 2018 (post-conference)
1:30 pm to 4:30 pm
$75 for conference attendees ($50 for students), or $100 as a stand-alone workshop

Ethical approaches to research in partnership with Indigenous peoples have evolved over the past 20 years and continue to do so. In this workshop, we will take a case-study approach to learn how research in partnership with Indigenous communities can be done in a meaningful and ethical way.

Workshop participants will benefit from small group discussions, the contributions of First Nations leaders, and input from researchers in the field. Following an introductory talk, participants will break out into small groups and discuss three case studies. Facilitators will report the outcomes of each case study to the small groups, and outcomes will then be further discussed by a panel of First Nations speakers.

Learning objectives: To use a case-study approach to learn about specific ethical issues in community-based research involving Indigenous communities, including relationship-building, agenda and priority-setting, and scale and spread of innovations.

Case study subjects:

  1. Ownership, Control, Access, Possession (OCAP™) – what it means and how it can be operationalized
  2. Scaling up – What it means in the conventional context and how it is different in a First Nations context
  3. Challenges of different methodologies. How to implement standardized interventions in different communities with different needs, challenges, and realities.

Registration is open. If you have already registered for the conference, you may amend your registration to add the workshop.

Questions? Please contact Kasra Hassani at kasra.hassani@ubc.ca